Resident Provocateur at CANeLearn Symposium

This post serves as my public thinkspace throughout the Canadian eLearning Network’s Symposium, April 5-7. My thanks to everyone at CANeLearn for inviting me to participate and share in this important professional event. Resident Provocateur I am currently attending the Canadian eLearning Network’s 2017 Symposium in Vancouver, British Columbia. At both the Pre-Conference (April 5)…

Marginal Syllabus as OER and OEP

This post was originally published on the Marginal Syllabus. Yesterday, thanks to authors Dawn Reed and Troy Hicks, we launched the sixth Marginal Syllabus monthly flash mob via our emerging model of public and collaborative web annotation-as-conversation. We’re now more than halfway through the academic year, and as a Marginal Syllabus organizer I’ve been thinking a lot…

Annotathon: Dialogue about a Political Theory of Learning

An Invitation In collaboration with The Politics of Learning Writing Collective and the journal Cognition & Instruction, a global community of scholars is invited to participate in an annotathon from Monday, February 27th through Friday, March 3rd. During this annotathon, participants will use the web annotation platform Hypothesis to advance a public dialogue with The Politics of Learning Writing Collective layered…

Annotating the News

What does annotating the news afford education, and why should designers and facilitators of learning engage the emerging trend of annotated news? I’ve been the reading the news a lot lately – no surprise there. And, given what’s happening in our world right now, you probably have been, too. If your experience has been anything like mine, perhaps…

Web Annotation as #DisruptiveMedia

Over the past few weeks I have had the pleasure of co-authoring a conversation about web annotation for the “disrupted” issue of the Journal of Media Practice. My co-author is none other than my dear friend and colleague Jeremy Dean, Director of Education at Hypothesis. Our conversation about the practices and politics of web annotation is intended…

Annotation: Toward Resistance and Solidarity

This post was originally published on the Marginal Syllabus. An update on Marginal Syllabus activities is long overdue. Here are a few thoughts about what this emergent experiment in informal educator learning has done, where it may be going, and what some of us are thinking – particularly in a post-election context that demands critical thinking, resistance, solidarity, and activism.…

Reflecting on Marginal Syllabus’ First Flash Mob

Last Wednesday, September 31st, about a dozen folks came together with Chris Gilliard – co-author of Digital Redlining, Access, and Privacy – to discuss the in/visibility of information, students’ access to equitable learning opportunities and experiences, and the various practices that either reify or attempt to circumvent digital redlining. According to Chris, digital redlining occurs…

Introducing The Marginal Syllabus

I always enjoy the start of a new school year; it’s an exciting transition, a time to play with new ideas, launch projects, and (most importantly!) collaborate with – and learn from – other people. This year, I’m excited to help organize and facilitate The Marginal Syllabus in partnership with colleagues from Hypothesis and Aurora Public Schools.…

I Annotate 2016 Presentation in Berlin

Below are video and slides from my I Annotate 2016 presentation. Positing Playful Annotation in the Open was presented on May 20th, 2016, in Berlin, Germany. This presentation concerns the University of Colorado Denver’s graduate course INTE 5320 Games and Learning, and examines the role of open web annotation with Hypothesis in course planning, pedagogy, student learning, and reflection on practice.

A Few Additional Glimpses

This is the second post in which I’m sharing graduate learners’ reflections on their use of open web annotation in INTE 5320 Games and Learning (my first post is here). The previous post generated favorable attention from students and supporters alike: Powerful student testimonials here on web annotation/@hypothes_is Thanks, @remiholden and co. https://t.co/U18gXP42wX — Dr. Dean (@dr_jdean)…

Glimpsing the Impact of Open Annotation

Three times throughout this Spring semester, graduate learners in INTE 5320 Games and Learning are asked to reflect upon – and then blog about – their own learning. These learning reflections are semi-structured; I provide a few guiding questions alongside more open-ended and learner-initiated contributions. One of my prompts asks the following: How have the more open…

Annotation in the Open: Part 3

This is an open letter to my amazing graduate learners in INTE 5320: Games and Learning. My letter is motivated by recent debate about open annotation, free speech, abuse and harassment, and the challenges of expression and interaction in a networked and open web. As background, blog readers and/or graduate learners are encouraged to also read these articles – and…

Playful Annotation in the Open: Part 2

This post is the second in an ongoing series about playfulness in open web annotation. My comments are exploratory, driven by curiosity, and rooted in the experiences of INTE 5320 Games and Learning. I am grateful to the graduate learners of #ILT5320 whose annotation with the platform Hypothesis has greatly challenged my practices and conceptions of learning.…

(Re)Marking upon #ProfChat

This past Tuesday evening’s #profchat discussed open annotation in higher education. I had the honor and pleasure of serving as moderator. How come? I volunteered to moderate based entirely upon my rather nascent experiences learning with Hypothesis this semester in INTE 5320 Games and Learning. And in an effort to open – that is, to…

Annotation in the Open: Part 2

A few days ago, Robin DeRosa – open pedagogy advocate and superstar Hypothesis annotator – shared the following via #digped on Twitter: Have a good post abt the concerns of Ss working in public? Looking for PRO-open, with good ideas for managing challenges. Please RT! #digped — Robin DeRosa (@actualham) February 26, 2016 I read Robin’s invitation…

Playful Annotation in the Open

Games and Learning turns one-month old today. Among many highlights from our first month, in this post I’ll discuss one of my growing curiosities – playful annotation in the open. And it looks something like this: Curious about what’s happening here? Let me briefly sketch some context. First, INTE 5320 Games and Learning is an online graduate course at the…

Annotation in the Open: Part 1

INTE 5320 Games and Learning is structured by seven iterative cycles of reading and annotation-as-discussion – each cycle building conceptually upon previous resources and ideas, and each spanning approximately two weeks (see our Readings for a calendar). As our first cycle’s introduction to games and learning comes to a close, so too does our collective “first draft”…

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